History of the Coldstream Guards

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Photographs and history of the The Coldstream Guards. during the reign of Queen Victoria.

The two battalions of the Coldstream Guards rank second in army seniority in the brigade, though they claim to have an earlier origin, having been raised in 1650 by Cromwell from five companies of Fenwick's regiment and five from Haselrig's "Ironsides".  Under Monk's command they had their headquarters at Coldstream during the Scotch war, and hence their present name arose.  Marching to London in 1650 to assist in the restoration of the King, they were not disbanded, as were the other regiments of the army of the Lord Protector; but, taking allegiance to the Sovereign, they grounded theor arms and took them up again in the new service of Charles II.

At this period they were dressed in red with green facings, but the pikemen wore green with red "livery".  Green, too, was the colour of their standards, on which were a red cross and six white balls.  On Monk's death the facings were altered to blue, when this colour formed the groundwork for their new standards.  James II changed it again to white.

Their history runs much on the same lines as that of the Grenadiers.  Detachments served in Tangiers, on the West Coast of Africa, and America, as well as seeing service afloat as marines; and they shared in the fighting at Cadiz and Vigo, Gibraltar and Almanza.

The first names on the battle-roll are those in Marlborough's campaigns after 1708; but, again, only companies were present, and not a complete battalion, at Oudenarde and Malplaquet.  The 1st Battalion fought as such at Dettingen and Fontenoy, adding the former name to its colours; and again in the second Stuart rebellion in 1745; while the 2nd Battalion saw service at Bergen op Zoom, and detachments, again, served in America at "White Plains" and the other battles that culminated in the surrender at York Town.

When the wars of the French Revolution broke out, the 1st Battalion served under Lake's command in 1793, and behaved with distinguished gallantry at St. Amand, near Famars, attempting to dislodge the French with a force of about 600 men, when an Austrian column nearly ten times as strong had failed.  The desperate bravery of Sergeant Darling, who continued in action though his arm had been broken by a bullet, until his leg was also shattered and he was made prisoner, is much commented on by contemporary historians of this severe battle.  In the same year the regiment added to their honours Lincelles, where they successfully fought, at one time almost single-handed, against overwhelming odds, taking two colours and two guns.

After brief periods of service, chiefly again by detachments, at Ostend, the Helder, and Bergen, the 1st battalion, after serving for a time at Ferrol and Vigo, joined the expedition to Egypt in 1801, being present at the battle of Alexandria and the subsequent siege, for which it bears the badge of the "Sphinx" and the word "Egypt".  It was at Copenhagen in 1807, and served in the Peninsula from 1809 to 1814, sharing in the passage of the Duoro, the battles of Talavera and Barossa, the sieges of Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz, Burgos, and St. Sebastian, and the battles of Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, the Ptrenees, Bidassoa, Nive, Nivelle, and Bayonne, for which the battalion richly earned the right to bear "Peninsula" on its colours; and the specific engagements of Barossa and Talavera, where in the latter fight alone 600 of its men fell.  The next foreign service of this battalion was in Portugal in 1827 and in Canada in 1838; and it represented the regiment in the Crimea, earning for its list of honours the names of Alma, Sebastopol, and Inkerman, where a few hundreds held the redoubt against thousands.  This campaign won the Victoria Cross for Privates Stanlock and Strong, and for Brevet-Majors Gerald Littlehales Goodlake and John Augustus Conolly, the latter being promoted from the 49th into the regiment for his "exemplary behaviour on the 26th October, 1854".  Finally it took part in the campaign in Egypt in 1882, forming part of the Duke of Connaught's brigade at Tel-El-Kebir, and a detachment formed part of the Guards' Camel Corps in the Bayuda desert later on.

Meanwhile the 2nd battalion had been not less distinguished.  Companies had been engaged in the Walcheren expedition and at Barossa, at Bergen op Zoom, and Quatre Bras; and finally to some of its companies was entrusted the defence if the Chateau of Hougoumont on the right of the English line at Waterloo.  The last name in the list of regimental honours is that of Suakim, 1885, in which this battalion was also engaged.

The regimental badge of the Coldstream Guards, though not strictly authorised, is the star of the Garter, worn on collar and cap, and the bearskins are distinguished by a red feather, there being also a white rose on the shoulder strap.  The companies share with the other regiments of the household troops the peculiarity of company badges.  These, authorised in 1751 and later, in order are a white lion passant, Prince of Wales's plume, a spotted panther, two crossed swords, George and the dragon, red rose in the Garter, an "escarbuncle", a white boar with golden bristles, a dun cow, a re and white rose impaled with a pomegranate, white horse of Hanover, electoral bonnet of Hanover, and the white horse of Hanover again.

Beyond the "Coldstream" there has been no special name attached to the regiment except the "Nulli Secundus Club", possibly given in sarcastic allusion to the fact that they rank second in the list, they claim an earlier origin than the Grenadiers, and admit of no inferiority therefor.

Extract from "The British Army and Auxiliary Forces" Colonel C. Cooper King, R.M.A. , 1894

The regiment was raised in June 1650 George Monck was appointed by Oliver Cromwell to command the new Model Army. five companies of the regiment was drafted from Hazleriggs and Fenwicks  regiments. Monck's regiment first saw action on the 3rd september 1659 at the battle of Dunbar. Which gained them the Dunbar medal./ The regiment was stationed at Coldstream due to the lawless ness of the area. On the 1st January 1660 the regiment marched to London. and played a major role in the restoring of Law and Order in London and surrounding area. The regiment supported the elections which saw the return of the Monarchy in the form of King Charles II.

When Venner led an insurrection in London. Much of the New Model army had been disbanded, and Moncks regiment was the only disciplined regiment to restore law and order. and for doing so the regiment were given the privilege of laying down their arms and a parliamentary regiment and picking them up again as the Lord General's Regiment of Foot Guards.

In 1666 a number of men from Moncks regiment were re organised to become the Royal marines and served with the Fleet Monck himself was given the rank of Admiral.

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Col. R. Pole-Carew, C.B., Commanding 2nd Coldstream Guards. (1895)

Colonel Reginald Pole-Carew, C.B., commanding the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards, entered the regiment as an Ensign in May, 1869.  He attained the rank of Colonel in the Army in October, 1888, and the regimental rank of Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards in February, 1895.

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Col. F.A. Graves-Sawle, Commanding 1st Coldstream Guards. (1895)

Colonel Francis Aylmer Graves-Sawle, commanding the 1st Battalion Coldsream Guards entered the regiment as an Ensign in June, 1868.  He attained the rank of Colonel in the Army in April, 1889, and the regimental rank of Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards in September, 1894.

Original magazine photo page published 1895 - 1902.  Price ?25.   Or reproduction of photograph ready mounted. Price ?25. Click here to order.  ORDER CODE 1V18

Two Notable Guardsmen. (1895)

Second-lieutenant Heathcote-Amory of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, is the tallest officer (6' 5.25") in the Guard's Brigade.The Drummer is John Maskell, a boy with a story.  Picked up at the manoeuvres near Swindon, in 1893, while following the troops, and found to be an orphan and a fine spirited boy, the officers of the battalion placed him in the Gordon Boys' Home.  There John Maskell did well and became cornet player in the band, whence the officers of the Coldstream Guards took him into their own band as a drummer.  He is a universal favorite and a good boy.

Drum-Major Patrick, 2nd Coldstream Guards (1895)

Our portrait of Drum-Major Patrick of the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards is particularly interesting, in that the gallant Drum-Major besides being himself a credit to his corps belongs to it by hereditary association.  His father served in the 2nd Coldstream Guards, and three of his uncles fell in action while with the battalion in the Russian War.  Drum-Major Patrick himself enlisted in the wnd Coldstream Guards in 1875, at the age of fourteen, and served with the battalion in the Egyptian Campaign of 1882, for which he wears the medal and star.  He is an East Anglian, from Great Yarmouth, and has the good conduct medal.

Musketry Drill in Barracks with the Coldstream Guards. (1896)

Before the soldier goes to the ranges for rifle practice he is carefully instructed in the barrack square in everything that can possibly help forward his musketry training.  To teach the elements of marksmanship, and train the arm, hand and eye to act together, an all-important preliminary, requires unremitting supervision and constant drilling.  These men of the Coldstream Guards are under instruction in volley firing practice - with a view later on to the butts at Pirbright, and regimental work in the Long Valley during the Aldershot drill season.

A Squad of the Coldstream Guards at Physical Drill (1896)

Physical drill is a comparative innovation in our Service, and owes its introduction, in the first instance, to the short-service system, and the urgent necessity for "licking into shape" the young and immature recruits who nowadays find their way into the Army.  These men belong to the Coldstream Guards, in their white undress jackets - a relic of the old white waistcoat that down to the days of William the Fourth every soldier wore under his tunic.

General Inspection Group of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards at Dublin. (1896)

The Inspecting Officer on the occasion was General Moncrieff, who is shown in the centre of the group wearing a double-breasted general officer's tunic, and with his plumed cocked hat on his knee.  The present Colonel of the Coldstream Guards is Viscount Falmouth, C.B., who served with the regiment in the Egyptian Campaign in 1882, was present at Tel-El-Kebir, and in 1884-5 commanded the Guards' Camel Corps in the Nile Expedition at the battles of Abu Klea and El Gubat.  The Coldstream regiment was originally raised at Coldstream, on the borders of Scotland, by General Monk.

Pioneer Sergeant H. Tesh, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards. (1896).

The pioneers in the Army comprise a small body of men attached to each infantry regiment (one to each company), for the purpose, particularly on active service, of clearing away and cutting down obstacles in the way of the troops.  For this duty each man carries a particular tool or special implement.  The pioneers form also a small corps of regimental artificers for general work, either in barracks or in camp, and are employed in the regimental workshops, and assist in the instruction of soldiers desirous of learning a trade.  They are usually specially enlisted from among artizans and skilled workmen.  Pioneer Sergeant H. Tesh, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, who is in charge of the Pioneers in his Battalion, is a Sheffield man.  He enlisted in August, 1882, at the age of 21, and worked his way up through the various subordinate grades to his present position to which he was promoted in April, 1890.  He saw service in Egypt, and was at Suakim in 1885, for which he wears the Egyptian medal and the Khedive's star.  The pioneers march past at the head of the regiment.

Private - Coldstream Guards

Pioneer - Coldstream Guards

Sergeant Major - Coldstream Guards

Sergeant, Signalling - Coldstream Guards

The Colonel and Adjutant in Camp in Wet Weather.

The Coldstream Guards at Physical Drill

How Private Duncan White And Other Men Of The 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards Won The D.C.M. At Cuinchy

    On February 1st 1915, a fine piece of work was carried out by the 4th (Guards) Brigade in the neighbourhood of Cuinchy, where fierce had been in progress for some days.  Very early in the morning the Germans made a determined attack in considerable force on some trenches near the La Bassee Canal, occupied by a party of the 2nd Coldstreams, who were compelled to abandon them.  A counter attack by a company of the Irish Guards and half a company of the Coldstreams, delivered some three quarters of an hour later, failed to dislodge the enemy, owing to the withering enfilading fire which it encountered.  But about ten in the forenoon our artillery opened a heavy bombardment of the lost trenches, which is described by General Haking, by whose orders it was undertaken, as ?splendid, the high explosive shells dropping in the exact spot with absolute precision.?  This successful artillery preparation, which lasted for about ten minutes, was immediately followed by brilliant bayonet charge made by about fifty men of the 2nd Coldstreams and thirty of the Irish Guards.  The Irish Guards attacked on the left, where barricades strengthened the enemy?s position; and it was here that Lance-Corporal Michael O?Leary performed that heroic feat of arms, which gained him the Victoria Cross and made his name a household word.  But the Coldstreams also had their heroes that day, and amongst them a young Yorkshire man. Private Duncan white, whose action, if necessarily overshadowed by that of O?Leary, was nevertheless, a most gallant one.

            Private White was one of a little party of bomb throwers who led the assault, and on Captain Leigh Bennett, who commanded the Coldstreams, giving the signal for the charge by dropping his handkerchief, he dashed to the front and, passing unscathed through the fierce rifle and machine gunfire which greeted the advancing Guardsmen, got within throwing distance and began to rain bombs on the Germans with astonishing rapidity and precision.  High above the parapet flew the rocket like missiles, twisting and travelling uncertainly through the air, until finally the force equilibrium supplied by the streamers of ribbon attached to their long sticks asserted itself, and they plunged straight as a plumb line down into the trench, exploding with a noise like a gigantic Chinese cracker and scattering its occupants in dismay.  So fast did he throw, and so deadly was his aim that the enemy, already badly shaken by our artillery preparation, were thrown into hopeless disorder; and the Guardsmen had no difficulty in rushing the trench, all the Germans in it being killed or made prisoners.  A party of the Royal Engineers with sandbags and wire, to make the captured trench defensible, had followed the attacking infantry.  Scarcely had they completed their task, when the German guns began to shell its new occupants very heavily; but our men held their ground, and subsequently succeeded in taking another German trench on the embankment of the canal and two machine guns.  Private Duncan White, whose home is at Sheffield, was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry and skill, as also were Privates F. Richardson, S.B. Leslie and J. Saville, of the same regiment. Extracted from 'Deeds That Thrill The Empire'

 

How Private Charles Ball, Of The 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards, Won The D.C.M. Near Zonnebeke

    A particularly daring and successful piece of work-a duty, which demands great courage, coolness and resourcefulness from those who undertake, it-was performed by Charles Ball, a young private of the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards, at the end of October 1914, near Zonnebeke.  About nine o?clock on the morning of October 26th, Private Ball and one of his comrades left the British trenches, with the object of penetrating the German lines and picking up what information they could in regard to the disposition and movements of the enemy?s forces.  After proceeding for some little distance, most of the way on all fours, they entered a field, in which lay about a score of dead and wounded Germans.  Some of the latter appealed to them piteously for water, and the two Guardsmen therefore decided that Ball should remain where he was, and that the other should go back to our lines to obtain water and to inquire what they were to do with the wounded.  He returned in about half an hour, with orders that they were to leave them to some other men and endeavour to reach a farm on the other side of the field, which was occupied by the enemy.  They accordingly set off again, but as they were wriggling their way along the further hedge, they caught sight of a German sniper also crawling along it and coming in their direction, though apparently unaware of their presence.  As they had orders not to shoot unless forced to do so, they concealed themselves in the ditch, which ran parallel with the hedge, behind a bush that had been torn from its roots by a shell and had fallen across it.  There they lay expecting the sniper to pass them by, when they intended to surprise and make a prisoner of him, which would spare them the necessity of giving the alarm by shooting him.  But when he was within ten paces of them, he suddenly turned to go back, and Private Hall, recognizing that it would be impossible for them to proceed further until the fellow was disposed of, decided to take the risk.  He therefore fired and dropped the German stone dead.  As the farm for which the Guardsman had been making was only some thirty yards distant, and they feared that the rifle shot might bring its occupants down upon them, they continued to lie low for another half hour.  They then crawled out of the ditch and made their way, still on all fours, through some unoccupied German trenches to a spot a little distance beyond whence they had a clear view of a distant hill, on the summit of which was a windmill.  From the number of troops which they saw pass this windmill; they concluded that German reinforcements must be stationed behind the hill.  Ball sent his comrade back to the British lines with a message to that effect.  But the latter had not been gone long, when he came back, with the alarming information that there retreat was cut off, as the Germans had come out of the farm and manned the unoccupied trenches which they had just passed. 

            They both crawled back as near to the trenches as they could without being seen, determined to sell their lives dearly rather than be made prisoners.  To their surprise, however, they saw that the enemy were moving along the trenches, so they lay still for an hour and a half, in momentary fear of being discovered and shot before they could show fight.  After the Germans had passed along the trenches, the Guardsman crawled through them and hid them in the friendly ditch again, and, believing that they were now comparatively safe, they began to crawl as fast as they could along it.  Suddenly, from the other side of the hedge, a rifle shot rang out, and, peering cautiously through, they saw six Germans engaged in watching the distant British trenches.  They accordingly lay low, Ball keeping an eye on the six Germans in front, while his comrade watched the farmhouse, to guard against any surprise from that quarter.  About half an hour passed thus, when Ball saw the German sharpshooters turn and begin to crawl towards the hedge, with the evident intention of coming through it into the ditch in which the Guardsman lay.  The latter waited until the Huns were within twenty paces of them, and then, each picking his man, fired and shot him dead.  Again the Coldstreams rifles cracked, and again two of the astonished enemy fell, while the survivors sprang to their feet and made off as fast as they could.  A well-aimed bullet brought one of them down, but the other succeeded in getting away.

             Ball and his comrade recognized that they had not a moment to lose if they wished to effect their own escape, as the surviving Hun would, of course, give the alarm, even if the shots they had fired had not already done so.  They had to crawl along the ditch for a hundred yards and then to cross two ploughed fields and the wire entanglements-a sufficiently formidable undertaking with the enemy on the alert.  But the brave lads courage did not fail them, and, on reaching the end of the ditch, they jumped up and made a dash across the fields and over the entanglements.  Before they had covered many yards of open ground they were seen by Germans, who did not forget to let them know it.  However, through bullets hummed incessantly past their heads, neither of them was hit, and they reached the British lines in safety, and reported what the enemy were doing and where their reinforcements were being drawn from.  It was clear, from the information they brought back, that an attack was intended, and sure enough, at three o?clock that afternoon-the two Guardsmen had returned about an hour earlier the German guns began to rain high explosive shells upon our trenches in such profusion that that day will always be known to the men for whose benefit these unpleasant looking projectiles were intended as ?coal box Friday.?  After the artillery preparation, the Huns attacked in great force; but the French coming to our support, they were driven back with terrible loss.  That night Private Ball?s battalion was transferred to Ypres, and in the woods in the vicinity of that town the enterprising young guardsman experienced several further adventures when on patrol work.  During the battle of Ypres he was wounded in no less than ten places, but, happily none of his wounds was very serious, and after being invalided home for a time, he was able to return to duty.  ?For his conspicuous good work on patrol duty on October 26th,? Private Ball was awarded the D.C.M., and, subsequently, the Russian Order of St. George (Third Class) was conferred upon him by the Czar.  The recipient of those decorations, who is only one and twenty, is a Lancashire man, his home being at Moses Gate, near Bolton.  Extracted from 'Deeds That Thrill The Empire'         

   

How Company Sergeant Major Fred Seaman, Of The 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards Won The D.C.M. At Cuinchy

    Worthy, indeed, of their glorious traditions has been the conduct of the Coldstream Guards in the Great War, and terrible have been the losses suffered and many the distinctions gained by the officers and men of that famous corps.  But among of splendid deeds of gallantry and devotion, which we might mention here, that which won Company-Sergeant Major Fred Seaman, of the 2nd Battalion, the D.C.M. will bear comparison with any.  Shortly after two o?clock on the morning of February 1st 1915, during the action at Cuinchy, the enemy rushed one of our trenches, and Sergeant major Seaman?s company received orders to retake it.  So heavy had been the losses of this company, that only of its officers was fit for duty; and the command of the party, which consisted of twenty men, was therefore, entrusted to the sergeant major, who was instructed to rush the trench from the towpath of the canal, acting in conjunction with a second party, which was to attack from the other side of the railway embankment.

            Under cover of the railway embankment, which runs parallel with the canal, Seaman led his party at the double along the towpath, until they arrived at a culvert beneath the railway, which they found that the enemy had barricaded in such a way that there was only sufficient room for one men to squeeze through at a time.  Around this opening, at a distance of about thirty yards, he drew up his men in a half circle, and had just done so, when he received a message from his commanding officer, inquiring if it were possible to get through the culvert.  The sergeant major sent back answer that it was only possible to get one man in at a time, and that he proposed to go him.  He then entered the place, and, dauntless as Horatius upon the bridge at Rome, remained there for an hour and a half, holding the enemy at bay and repulsing every attempt they made to get through and cut his party and the attacking party off.  For though the Germans tried again and again, they could come at him one at a time, and whenever the Guardsman?s deadly rifle spoke, the forest Hun Fell.  The gallant sergeant major did not escape unhurt, however, as he was wounded in the arm by a bomb thrown by one of the enemy, though, happily, the injury was not serious enough to prevent him from continuing to use his rifle.  Eventually, the trench was retaken by the other party of our men, amongst whom, it is interesting to note, was the famous Michael O?Leary, V.C., who distinguished himself not a little on this occasion.  Company Sergeant Major Seaman, who received his decoration ?for conspicuous gallantry and ability,? is twenty-eight years of age, and his home is at Windsor.  Extracted from 'Deeds That Thrill The Empire' 

WILLIAM STANLACK  (Private)  1st Battalion Coldstream Guards

GEORGE STRONG  (Private)  1st Battalion Coldstream Guards            When on duty in the trenches, in September 1855, Private Strong picked up, and threw aside, a live shell, which had fallen among the men.

GERALD L;ITTLEHALES GOODLAKE  (Captain, afterwards Lieut. ?General)  1st Batt. Coldstream Guards  Knight Of The Legion Of Honour            On the occasion of ?the powerful sortie? made chiefly against the second Division on October 26th 1854, Major Goodlake was in command of the Sharpshooters of his battalion in the ?Windmill Ravine? well in advance of the picket-house erected there.  This he held against a large force, his men placing hors-de-combat no fewer than thirty-eight of the enemy and taking three prisoners.  The Major during this combat was the only officer present, and most of his men were very young soldiers, the successors of their more matured comrades who fell at Alma and during the siege.  In November following in the same place, when commanding almost the same men, he surprised a picket, the following extract from Kinglake?s Crimea gives an illustration of the invaluable work done by Captain Goodlake ad his Sharpshooters during the war-    

The Colours and Drums of the Coldstream Guards (1898)

Changing Guard at the Tower of London. (1898)

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Escort to the Colour by William Barnes Wollen.


Escort to the Colour by William Barnes Wollen.

The Coldstream Guards.


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The Infantry of the Guard by Michael Angelo Hayes


The Infantry of the Guard by Michael Angelo Hayes

Combining all the regiments of Guards, Coldstream Guards, Grenadier Guards, Scots Guards and Irish Guards in this superb print.


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S Company Scots Guards in the battle of Monte Piccolo, Italy 28th May 1944. by Terence Cuneo.


S Company Scots Guards in the battle of Monte Piccolo, Italy 28th May 1944. by Terence Cuneo.

S Company Scots Guards along with 3 Company Coldstream Guards, after heavy fighting, captures the hill from the German 1st Parachute regiment.
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On Sentry by William Barnes Wollen.


On Sentry by William Barnes Wollen.

A Coldstream Guardsman on sentry as a troop of Life Guards go by.


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The Ensign by William Barnes Wollen.


The Ensign by William Barnes Wollen.

The Coldstream Guards leaving Buckingham Palace.


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Coldstream Guards by Richard Simkin.


Coldstream Guards by Richard Simkin.



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Coldstream Guards Entering the Bank of England for Guard Duty by Harry Payne


Coldstream Guards Entering the Bank of England for Guard Duty by Harry Payne



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The Wounded Coldstream Guardsman by Alfred D Prades.


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Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler.


Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler.

A column of exhausted and wounded men of the Coldstream Guards and the 20th East Devonshire regiment returning from the heights of Inkerman, 5th November 1854, during the Crimean War.
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Private Chillingworth assisting in bombing the enemy from a trench, which they had captured.


Private Chillingworth assisting in bombing the enemy from a trench, which they had captured.

On Octber 8th 1815, the enemy attacked with great determination along the trenches occupied by the 3rd Battalion Coldstream guards, near Loos, and came pouring into a trench on the left of that occupied by Private Chillingworth and five other men. The situation was most critical. But realising what had happened, Private Chilingsworth and his comrades sprang forward with great gallantry to face the enemy. With bombs they drove at least ten times their number, who stubbornly opposed them, by foot down the trench until they had recaptured the whole of it. For great bravery and resource Chillingworth was awarded the D.C.M.
Item Code : DTE0400Private Chillingworth assisting in bombing the enemy from a trench, which they had captured. - Editions Available
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Officer of the Coldstream Guards (Winter Dress) by L Mansion & L Eschauzier (P)


Officer of the Coldstream Guards (Winter Dress) by L Mansion & L Eschauzier (P)

Item Code : ANT0166Officer of the Coldstream Guards (Winter Dress) by L Mansion & L Eschauzier (P) - Editions Available
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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Reprint published by Connoisseur Publishing Co. 1909 of the original uniform plate published by Spooner 1830-40 from the series of 70 plates entitled Military & Naval Costumes by L Mansion and L Eschauzier, coloured by Martin C Bowen.
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The Coldstream Guards Departing London for a Campaign by Robert Hillingford


The Coldstream Guards Departing London for a Campaign by Robert Hillingford



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Item Code : VARX0001The Coldstream Guards Departing London for a Campaign by Robert Hillingford - Editions Available
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Defence of Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew.


Defence of Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew.

The British 1st Foot Guards and Coldstream Guards rush to defend the gate of Hougoumont Farm against a fierce French attack during the battle of Waterloo. During the battle, the Coldstream Guards lost 97 killed, 446 wounded and 4 missing, while the 1st Foot Guards lost 125 killed and 352 wounded.
Item Code : DHM1591Defence of Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)Artist : Jason AskewHalf
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 20 publisher proofs.
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Limited edition of up to 50 giclee canvas prints.
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Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Jason Askew
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Limited edition of up to 50 giclee canvas prints.
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Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Jason Askew
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Original painting, oil on canvas by Jason Askew.
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POSTCARDCollector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.
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Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)none£2.50

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**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (4 copies reduced to clear)
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Coldstream Guards by Douglas Anderson


Coldstream Guards by Douglas Anderson



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Item Code : UN0210Coldstream Guards by Douglas Anderson - Editions Available
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PRINT Open edition print.
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Grenadier, Coldstream Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman


Grenadier, Coldstream Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman

This image, based on the Clothing Warrant of 1768 and on actual items of clothing still in existence, shows a typical grenadier of this period. The most striking change in dress is the replacement of the grenadiers mitre by a fur cap. The grenadier cap began originally as a fur-trimmed cap, and the fur trimming was replaced by the stiff front, which we have seen in several prints, but in the 1768 warrant the fur cap was brought back. In fact it must have made its return before that date. Indeed, some regiments had never worn the mitre. The grenadiers of the Black Watch, for instance, always wore a fur cap closely resembling the one shown here. It was this fur cap that gradually developed into the bearskin that is worn by the Foot Guards today. It is often said that the bearskin cap was introduced into the army by the Prince Regent in imitation of the bearskin caps of Napoleons Guard. This is not so. The fur cap had its own respectable ancestry on this side of the Channel, as .........


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Item Code : PHS0017Grenadier, Coldstream Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman - Editions Available
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Hougoumont by Robert Gibb.


Hougoumont by Robert Gibb.

Showing the 1st Foot Guards and The Coldstream Guards struggling to close the gates at Hougoumont Farm against the Heavy French forces at the Height of the the battle of waterloo. During the Battle of waterloo the 1st Foot Guards and the Coldstream Guards losses were as follows. 1st Foot Guards, 125 Killed, 352 Wounded, and the Coldstream Guards losses, were 97 killed and 446 wounded and four missing.
Item Code : DHM0058Hougoumont by Robert Gibb. - Editions Available
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Coldstream Guards by Harry Payne.


Coldstream Guards by Harry Payne.



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Item Code : UN0001Coldstream Guards by Harry Payne. - Editions Available
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PRINTOpen edition print.
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The Guards at Inkerman, November 5th 1854 by Robert Gibb.


The Guards at Inkerman, November 5th 1854 by Robert Gibb.



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Item Code : VAR0701The Guards at Inkerman, November 5th 1854 by Robert Gibb. - Editions Available
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PRINT Open edition reprint.
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Original antique print published 1915.
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Company-Sergeant-Major Seaman Holding Back The Germans Single Handed.


Company-Sergeant-Major Seaman Holding Back The Germans Single Handed.

When the railway was reached, it was discovered that further progress was blocked by a culvert which the Germans had barricaded in such a way that only one man could pass through the opening at a time. It was also discovered that the Germans had no intention of waiting to be attacked, but were attempting to outflank and cut off the party. It was essential that they should not use the opening in the culvert, and for an hour and a half Seaman (2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards) stationed himself by the arch, shooting down those who tried to pass through the gap. He was wounded by a bomb, fortunately not seriously enough to incapacitate him. The other party largely owing to seamans display of courage and determination eventually recaptured the lost trench. He received the D.C.M., as also did Privates D. White, F. Richardson and S. B. Leslie for their gallant conduct in bombing the enemys position.
Item Code : DTE0158Company-Sergeant-Major Seaman Holding Back The Germans Single Handed. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Corporal Brown And Lance-Corporal Dobson Dragging A Wounded Man Across The Open To The British Lines Under Fire.


Corporal Brown And Lance-Corporal Dobson Dragging A Wounded Man Across The Open To The British Lines Under Fire.

At Chavanne on September 28th 1914, during the last days of the battle of the Aisme, three men were sent out to reconnoitre in a thick mist. The German lines were very close, and the mist suddenly lifted. Two of the men were instantly shot, but the third got back to the British lines with only a graze. To leave the two men in the open meant fourteen hours exposure, and Lance-Corporal Frederick William Dobson, of the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards, therefore volunteered to try and bring them in immediately. He crawled out and found that one of the men was dead, while the other was wounded in three places. Having applied dressing he crawled back, and a few minutes later came out with Corporal Brown, the two men dragging between them a stretcher. The wounded man was placed on it, and then dragged back into safety. Not one of them was hit, and corporal Brown was awarded the D.C.M. and Lance-corporal Dobson the V.C. form most conspicuous gallantry.
Item Code : DTE0357Corporal Brown And Lance-Corporal Dobson Dragging A Wounded Man Across The Open To The British Lines Under Fire. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£13.00

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