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Better - than - half - price aviation art offers

A list of the amazing aviation art offers we have at the moment - popular items at prices of up to 70% off, all better than half price!

 

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138 items on 7 pages

 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background.  The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42  ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.  <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (Y)


With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Prints from the 225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot.      
Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £50     
WAS : £110     


Quantity:

  The Bristol Beaufighter was one of the most successful twin-engine fighters utilized by the RAF during WW II. The forerunner of the Beaufighter was the Bristol Beaufort, which was the first modern torpedo bomber to enter service. The Beaufort, known officially as the Type-152 was derived from the earlier Type-150, which in turn had been influenced by the Bristol Blenheim. About the time the first Beauforts were being flight tested, the aircrafts chief designer, Leslie Frise, commenced a study to see if the Beauforts airframe could be adapted to create a twin engine fighter design. The modified design (Type-156) incorporated a narrower fuselage, a shorter nose section utilizing a single-seat cockpit, and a dorsal observers position. The prototype Beaufighter made its first flight in July of 1939. A year of flight testing and refinement followed. Only Hercules III engines were available for the first production models. This gave the first marks performance roughly comparable to a Hawker Hurricane. Most Beaus were armed with four nose-mounted canon and an additional six machine guns in the wings. This gave the Beaufighter an impressive amount of firepower. As the Battle of Britain raged priority was given to modifying existing aircraft to the night fighter role. German bombers were relatively free from RAF fighters when attacking at night. The Beaufighter represented an ideal platform for this night fighter role. It was fast enough at 360-MPH to catch German bombers, it was heavily armed, and the observers position was an ideal spot to incorporate a radar operators controls. These night fighter versions were painted a matte black. On October 25, 1940 a Beaufighter recorded its first night victory. The Beaus utilized a transmitting antenna mounted on the nose, and receiving antennas mounted on the leading section of both wings. As the War progressed the Beaufighter would also become an important ground attack and fighter/bomber for the RAF. As depicted in Stan Stokes dramatic painting entitled Double Trouble, an RAF Beaufighter piloted by Group Captain John Cunningham downs a Ju-88 bomber. Cunningham was the RAFs top night fighter ace. He, and his radar operator Jimmy Rawnsley, were credited with nineteen night victories. Cunningham also downed one enemy aircraft during daylight.  He served with No. 604 Squadron, which had both a day and night fighter capability. The squadrons night fighting proficiency rose dramatically from late 1940 until mid-1941. By 1943, the Beaufighters were replaced with faster Mosquitoes. Cunningham was demobilized following the War. He joined DeHavilland Aircraft as its Chief Test Pilot following the War, and retired from British Aerospace in 1980. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Double Trouble by Stan Stokes. (Y)


The Bristol Beaufighter was one of the most successful twin-engine fighters utilized by the RAF during WW II. The forerunner of the Beaufighter was the Bristol Beaufort, which was the first modern torpedo bomber to enter service. The Beaufort, known officially as the Type-152 was derived from the earlier Type-150, which in turn had been influenced by the Bristol Blenheim. About the time the first Beauforts were being flight tested, the aircrafts chief designer, Leslie Frise, commenced a study to see if the Beauforts airframe could be adapted to create a twin engine fighter design. The modified design (Type-156) incorporated a narrower fuselage, a shorter nose section utilizing a single-seat cockpit, and a dorsal observers position. The prototype Beaufighter made its first flight in July of 1939. A year of flight testing and refinement followed. Only Hercules III engines were available for the first production models. This gave the first marks performance roughly comparable to a Hawker Hurricane. Most Beaus were armed with four nose-mounted canon and an additional six machine guns in the wings. This gave the Beaufighter an impressive amount of firepower. As the Battle of Britain raged priority was given to modifying existing aircraft to the night fighter role. German bombers were relatively free from RAF fighters when attacking at night. The Beaufighter represented an ideal platform for this night fighter role. It was fast enough at 360-MPH to catch German bombers, it was heavily armed, and the observers position was an ideal spot to incorporate a radar operators controls. These night fighter versions were painted a matte black. On October 25, 1940 a Beaufighter recorded its first night victory. The Beaus utilized a transmitting antenna mounted on the nose, and receiving antennas mounted on the leading section of both wings. As the War progressed the Beaufighter would also become an important ground attack and fighter/bomber for the RAF. As depicted in Stan Stokes dramatic painting entitled Double Trouble, an RAF Beaufighter piloted by Group Captain John Cunningham downs a Ju-88 bomber. Cunningham was the RAFs top night fighter ace. He, and his radar operator Jimmy Rawnsley, were credited with nineteen night victories. Cunningham also downed one enemy aircraft during daylight. He served with No. 604 Squadron, which had both a day and night fighter capability. The squadrons night fighting proficiency rose dramatically from late 1940 until mid-1941. By 1943, the Beaufighters were replaced with faster Mosquitoes. Cunningham was demobilized following the War. He joined DeHavilland Aircraft as its Chief Test Pilot following the War, and retired from British Aerospace in 1980.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Prints from the 225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot.      
Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £55     
WAS : £145     


Quantity:

 Simon Atack has recreated an action flown by Pilot Officer Bob Doe during a fierce battle over the south coast, near the Isle of Wight on 18th August, 1940. Flying a Mk I Spitfire of No 234 Squadron, Boe Doe is seen bringing down an Me109 High over Southampton, one of 14 Victories he achieved during the Battle of Britain. The third highest scoring fighter pilot of the battle, 20 year old Bob Doe was one of the few Aces to fly both Spitfires and Hurricanes during the battle. Simon captures the very essence of the most tumultous of all aerial conflicts in his dramatic painting, August Victory, with Bob flying his trusted Spitfire, D for Doe. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
August Victory by Simon Atack. (Y)


Simon Atack has recreated an action flown by Pilot Officer Bob Doe during a fierce battle over the south coast, near the Isle of Wight on 18th August, 1940. Flying a Mk I Spitfire of No 234 Squadron, Boe Doe is seen bringing down an Me109 High over Southampton, one of 14 Victories he achieved during the Battle of Britain. The third highest scoring fighter pilot of the battle, 20 year old Bob Doe was one of the few Aces to fly both Spitfires and Hurricanes during the battle. Simon captures the very essence of the most tumultous of all aerial conflicts in his dramatic painting, August Victory, with Bob flying his trusted Spitfire, D for Doe.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Signed limited edition of 500 prints.      
Paper size 31 inches x 24 inches (79cm x 61cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £90     
WAS : £190     


Quantity:

 As the Autumn of 1944 turned to winter, the USAAF Eighth Air Force bombers were penetrating ever deeper into enemy territory, attacking distant targets in central and south-east Germany. Large formations of seven or eight hundred bombers, escorted by as many fighters, darkened the skies over the Reich. Central to the massive daylight raids was the long-range capabilities of the P-51 Mustang, the most versatile fighter of the war.  Despite incessant pounding from the air, the Luftwaffe were putting up determined resistance, particularly in the south, often sending up several hundred fighters to meet the challenge. Huge aerial battles were fought between the opposing groups of fighters, and though the Allied pilots usually gained the upper hand in these encounters, the air fighting was prolonged and furious.  Typical of those encounters, on a single mission in November the Allied estimate of Luftwaffe sorties flown against them exceeded 750, but often the German fighters were handicapped by poor direction from the ground, hampering their effectiveness - on the 27th, several Gruppen were vectored directly towards the P-51s of the 357th and 353rd Groups believing them to be in-coming bombers. They paid the price, the Leiston based pilots of the 357th bagging 30 enemy fighters before they knew what hit them.  Successful as they were, the long-range escort missions flown by the P-51s were both hazardous and grueling. The weather, particularly in winter, was often appalling, and even an experienced pilot could become disoriented after hectic combat, and lost in the far reaches of the Reich.  The return to base in England after combat over distant enemy territory was always exhilarating, and the pilots often hedgehopped gleefully over towns and villages on their way home after crossing the English coast. Nicolas Trudgians painting depicts such a scene, with P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group racing over a typical English village as they head for Leiston and home. As the evening light fades, the peace and tranquillity of the snowy village, broken momentarily by the roar of Merlin engines, seems to bid the returning fighter boys a warm winters welcome. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Warm Winter's Welcome by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)


As the Autumn of 1944 turned to winter, the USAAF Eighth Air Force bombers were penetrating ever deeper into enemy territory, attacking distant targets in central and south-east Germany. Large formations of seven or eight hundred bombers, escorted by as many fighters, darkened the skies over the Reich. Central to the massive daylight raids was the long-range capabilities of the P-51 Mustang, the most versatile fighter of the war. Despite incessant pounding from the air, the Luftwaffe were putting up determined resistance, particularly in the south, often sending up several hundred fighters to meet the challenge. Huge aerial battles were fought between the opposing groups of fighters, and though the Allied pilots usually gained the upper hand in these encounters, the air fighting was prolonged and furious. Typical of those encounters, on a single mission in November the Allied estimate of Luftwaffe sorties flown against them exceeded 750, but often the German fighters were handicapped by poor direction from the ground, hampering their effectiveness - on the 27th, several Gruppen were vectored directly towards the P-51s of the 357th and 353rd Groups believing them to be in-coming bombers. They paid the price, the Leiston based pilots of the 357th bagging 30 enemy fighters before they knew what hit them. Successful as they were, the long-range escort missions flown by the P-51s were both hazardous and grueling. The weather, particularly in winter, was often appalling, and even an experienced pilot could become disoriented after hectic combat, and lost in the far reaches of the Reich. The return to base in England after combat over distant enemy territory was always exhilarating, and the pilots often hedgehopped gleefully over towns and villages on their way home after crossing the English coast. Nicolas Trudgians painting depicts such a scene, with P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group racing over a typical English village as they head for Leiston and home. As the evening light fades, the peace and tranquillity of the snowy village, broken momentarily by the roar of Merlin engines, seems to bid the returning fighter boys a warm winters welcome.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Signed limited edition of 500 prints.      
Image size 23 inches x 17 inches (58cm x 43cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £120     
WAS : £260     


Quantity:

 A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of the Battle of Britain, as Spitfires of No.66 Squadron scramble. <br><br><b>Some damage to border areas.</b><br>
Scramble by Gerald Coulson. (Y)


A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of the Battle of Britain, as Spitfires of No.66 Squadron scramble.

Some damage to border areas.

**Signed limited edition of 850 prints. (One reduced to clear)     
Image size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £100     
WAS : £220     


Quantity:

 Few pilots can resist the temptation for low flying should the opportunity present itself. Out of sight of the spoil-sport eyes of the authority, the rules will be broken, the artist would indulge in this chancy but undeniable thrill. A great sensation from any cockpit but for the artist nothing can compare with the effect from behind a pair of goggles to the accompaniment of humming wires around the cockpit of a Tiger Moth. <br><br><b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b><br>
Happy Days by Gerald Coulson. (Y)


Few pilots can resist the temptation for low flying should the opportunity present itself. Out of sight of the spoil-sport eyes of the authority, the rules will be broken, the artist would indulge in this chancy but undeniable thrill. A great sensation from any cockpit but for the artist nothing can compare with the effect from behind a pair of goggles to the accompaniment of humming wires around the cockpit of a Tiger Moth.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.

** (Ex Display) Signed limited edition of 500 prints. (One copy reduced to clear)      
Image size 26 inches x 20 inches (66cm x 51cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £90     
WAS : £200     


Quantity:

 During the early part of World War II the coastline of Britain was constantly under threat, particularly the busy shipping lanes of the North Sea.  As well as carrying out bombing raids on strategic coastal targets and ports such as Luftflotte 5s attack on the north-east in August 1940, allied shipping was regularly attacked at sea as the Luftwaffe tried to disrupt supplies.  The RAF played a vital part in protecting these supplies, escorting fishing fleets and shipping convoys, as well as long range patrols over the sea, seeking enemy activity and intercepting high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. These patrols were often long and arduous with pilots running the gauntlet of, if shot down, ditching into the sea. Often pilots would survive being hit and baling out, only to succumb to the freezing and hostile waters of the North Sea.  Often fighter squadrons being rested during the Battle of Britain, would be moved to northern locations such as Acklington and Leconfield, and carry out coastal and sea patrols before returning to the more intense fighting in the south. Flying over the Humber Estuary as the sun is setting, pilots of 610 Sqn return their MKII Spitfires to Leconfield after a convoy patrol late in 1940. <br><br><b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition with slight damage to the border.</b><br>
Evening Patrol by Gerald Coulson. (Y)


During the early part of World War II the coastline of Britain was constantly under threat, particularly the busy shipping lanes of the North Sea. As well as carrying out bombing raids on strategic coastal targets and ports such as Luftflotte 5s attack on the north-east in August 1940, allied shipping was regularly attacked at sea as the Luftwaffe tried to disrupt supplies. The RAF played a vital part in protecting these supplies, escorting fishing fleets and shipping convoys, as well as long range patrols over the sea, seeking enemy activity and intercepting high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. These patrols were often long and arduous with pilots running the gauntlet of, if shot down, ditching into the sea. Often pilots would survive being hit and baling out, only to succumb to the freezing and hostile waters of the North Sea. Often fighter squadrons being rested during the Battle of Britain, would be moved to northern locations such as Acklington and Leconfield, and carry out coastal and sea patrols before returning to the more intense fighting in the south. Flying over the Humber Estuary as the sun is setting, pilots of 610 Sqn return their MKII Spitfires to Leconfield after a convoy patrol late in 1940.

Ex-display prints in near perfect condition with slight damage to the border.

**Signed limited edition of 850 prints. (One print reduced to clear)      
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £150     
WAS : £325     


Quantity:

 The Avro lancatser, the backbone of the Royal Air Force Bomber Command during world war two. The Avro Lancaster was a development from the Avro Manchester, and with its four Rolls Royce Merlin engines it was able to carry a substantial bomb load.  The Lancaster entered service in 1942, with 44 Squadron based at RAF Waddington and 97 Squadron based at RAF Woodhall Spa.  Superior range and payload capability meant the Lancaster was able to strike at the heart of Germany and the factories of their war machine.  <br><br><b>Print has some damage on border plus some ingrained light dust marks on top and bottom of image..</b> <br>
The Long Journey Home by Adrian Rigby. (Y)


The Avro lancatser, the backbone of the Royal Air Force Bomber Command during world war two. The Avro Lancaster was a development from the Avro Manchester, and with its four Rolls Royce Merlin engines it was able to carry a substantial bomb load. The Lancaster entered service in 1942, with 44 Squadron based at RAF Waddington and 97 Squadron based at RAF Woodhall Spa. Superior range and payload capability meant the Lancaster was able to strike at the heart of Germany and the factories of their war machine.

Print has some damage on border plus some ingrained light dust marks on top and bottom of image..

**Open edition print. (One reduced to clear)     
Image size 32 inches x 12 inches (81cm x 31cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £25     
WAS : £60     


Quantity:

  The image shows Lancaster AJ-A attacking the Mohne dam, successfully causing a small breach.  Alongside is the portrait of AJ-A pilot Sqn Ldr H M Young.  This aircraft was shot down over the Dutch coast on the return journey, with the loss of all crew. <br><br><b>Crew of <i>A for Apple</i> :</b><br><br>Pilot : Sqn Ldr H M Young<br>Flight Engineer : Sgt D T Horsfall<br>Navigator : Flt Sgt D W Roberts<br>Wireless Operator : Sgt L W Nichols<br>Bomb Aimer : Flg Off V S MacCausland<br>Front Gunner : Sgt G A Yeo<br>Rear Gunner : Sgt W Ibbotson.  <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Tribute to the 617 Sqn Dambusters Crew of Lancaster AJ-A by David Pentland. (Y)


The image shows Lancaster AJ-A attacking the Mohne dam, successfully causing a small breach. Alongside is the portrait of AJ-A pilot Sqn Ldr H M Young. This aircraft was shot down over the Dutch coast on the return journey, with the loss of all crew.

Crew of A for Apple :

Pilot : Sqn Ldr H M Young
Flight Engineer : Sgt D T Horsfall
Navigator : Flt Sgt D W Roberts
Wireless Operator : Sgt L W Nichols
Bomb Aimer : Flg Off V S MacCausland
Front Gunner : Sgt G A Yeo
Rear Gunner : Sgt W Ibbotson.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Signed limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £85     


Quantity:

 The image shows Lancaster AJ-M attacking the Mohne dam.  Alongside is the portrait of AJ-M pilot Flt Lt J V Hopgood.  The second aircraft to attack the target, the aircraft was hit by flak, and its bomb bounced over the dam.  Caught in the blast from its own bomb, the aircraft crashed soon after passing over the dam, with just two of the crew surviving.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>M for Mother</i> :</b><br><br>Pilot : Flt Lt J V Hopgood<br>Flight Engineer : Sgt C Brennan<br>Navigator : Flg Off K Earnshaw<br>Wireless Operator : Sgt J W Minchin<br>Bomb Aimer : Sgt J W Fraser <i>(survived)</i><br>Front Gunner : Plt Off G H F G Gregory<br>Rear Gunner : Plt Off A F Burcher <i>(survived)</i>. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Tribute to the 617 Sqn Dambusters Crew of Lancaster AJ-M by David Pentland. (Y)


The image shows Lancaster AJ-M attacking the Mohne dam. Alongside is the portrait of AJ-M pilot Flt Lt J V Hopgood. The second aircraft to attack the target, the aircraft was hit by flak, and its bomb bounced over the dam. Caught in the blast from its own bomb, the aircraft crashed soon after passing over the dam, with just two of the crew surviving.

Crew of M for Mother :

Pilot : Flt Lt J V Hopgood
Flight Engineer : Sgt C Brennan
Navigator : Flg Off K Earnshaw
Wireless Operator : Sgt J W Minchin
Bomb Aimer : Sgt J W Fraser (survived)
Front Gunner : Plt Off G H F G Gregory
Rear Gunner : Plt Off A F Burcher (survived).

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Signed limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)      

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £85     


Quantity:

 Lancaster of 617 Sqn refueling at Scampton, May 1943, in preparation for Operation Chastise. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Topping Up by David Pentland. (Y)


Lancaster of 617 Sqn refueling at Scampton, May 1943, in preparation for Operation Chastise.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £90     


Quantity:

 Franco-German border, 22md November 1939.  While flying a routine border <i>Frei Jagd</i> for some reconnaissance Dorniers, eight Me109s of 3./JG2 were engaged by fourteen French Curtiss Hawks of GC II/4.  During the ensuing dogfight, the first combat for the Richthofen Geschwader since WW1, two of the French fighters were shot down.  The first by Lt Helmut Wick, was flown by the French ace Adjutant Camille Plubeau (14 victories) the other by Ofw Erwin Kley.  Wick was to go on to become one of the great aces of the Battle of Britain, achieving 56 victories before his death in November 1940.
First Combat by David Pentland.


Franco-German border, 22md November 1939. While flying a routine border Frei Jagd for some reconnaissance Dorniers, eight Me109s of 3./JG2 were engaged by fourteen French Curtiss Hawks of GC II/4. During the ensuing dogfight, the first combat for the Richthofen Geschwader since WW1, two of the French fighters were shot down. The first by Lt Helmut Wick, was flown by the French ace Adjutant Camille Plubeau (14 victories) the other by Ofw Erwin Kley. Wick was to go on to become one of the great aces of the Battle of Britain, achieving 56 victories before his death in November 1940.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £85     


Quantity:

 Tunisia, North Africa, 4th January 1943.  At 1600 hours, eight Fw190s from JG2 were scrambled from Kairouan airfield to intercept enemy aircraft flying recon over the Sbeitla and Fondouk areas.  The Allied formation came from Thelepte airfield and consisted of 6 Spitfires from the US 4th Fighter Squadron, 52 Fighter Group, and 6 Spitfires from the US 5th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, escorting 5 P-39s.  The Fw190s were south of Ousseltia when air combat with the escorting Spitfires began.  It was during this engagement that Staffelkapitan Oberleutnant Rudorffer <i>Yellow 1</i> of 6/JG2 claimed 2 of the American Spitfires.
African Expedition by David Pentland.


Tunisia, North Africa, 4th January 1943. At 1600 hours, eight Fw190s from JG2 were scrambled from Kairouan airfield to intercept enemy aircraft flying recon over the Sbeitla and Fondouk areas. The Allied formation came from Thelepte airfield and consisted of 6 Spitfires from the US 4th Fighter Squadron, 52 Fighter Group, and 6 Spitfires from the US 5th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, escorting 5 P-39s. The Fw190s were south of Ousseltia when air combat with the escorting Spitfires began. It was during this engagement that Staffelkapitan Oberleutnant Rudorffer Yellow 1 of 6/JG2 claimed 2 of the American Spitfires.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £85     


Quantity:

 Riga, Latvia, 30th June 1944.  Recently promoted Leutnant Otto <i>Bruno</i> Kittel. of 3 Staffel, JG54, chases his quarry at treetop level during a late evening sortie.  The downing of this flying tank brought his tally on this day to 4, a Yak, a P39 and two Sturmoviks.  Although not well known, Kittel was the fourth highest ranking ace, with 267 victories to his credit, including some 94 of the dreaded Sturmoviks.
Hunting Sturmoviks by David Pentland.


Riga, Latvia, 30th June 1944. Recently promoted Leutnant Otto Bruno Kittel. of 3 Staffel, JG54, chases his quarry at treetop level during a late evening sortie. The downing of this flying tank brought his tally on this day to 4, a Yak, a P39 and two Sturmoviks. Although not well known, Kittel was the fourth highest ranking ace, with 267 victories to his credit, including some 94 of the dreaded Sturmoviks.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.      
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £40     
WAS : £85     


Quantity:

  Colonel Steve Pisanos and his wingman in their P-47 Thunderbolts take an opportunity to attack a German train in France, 1944. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Devastating Thunder by Brian Bateman. (Y)


Colonel Steve Pisanos and his wingman in their P-47 Thunderbolts take an opportunity to attack a German train in France, 1944.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Signed limited edition of 50 prints.      
Size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £60     
WAS : £130     


Quantity:

 Having joined the RAF at the age of 19, James Francis Edwards was to end the war with a total of  20 confirmed kills and another 10 probables and was one of Canada's greatest aces.  He is depicted here in his Curtiss P.40, dispatching a Macchi MC.202 whilst defending Boston and Baltimore bombers on their way to attack the airfields of Daba on 19th October 1942. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Tribute to Wing Commander James 'Stocky' Edwards by Ivan Berryman. (Y)


Having joined the RAF at the age of 19, James Francis Edwards was to end the war with a total of 20 confirmed kills and another 10 probables and was one of Canada's greatest aces. He is depicted here in his Curtiss P.40, dispatching a Macchi MC.202 whilst defending Boston and Baltimore bombers on their way to attack the airfields of Daba on 19th October 1942.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Limited edition of 30 giclee prints.      
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £50     
WAS : £105     


Quantity:

 Born in 1906, Carlo Maurizio Ruspoli di Poggio Suasa is recorded as being probably the oldest Italian fighter pilot to become an ace, serving both in the North Africa campaign and on the Russian front, as depicted here, claiming a Polikarpov I.16.  He ended the war with a victory total of 10 confirmed aircraft destroyed and died in 1947.<br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Tribute to Capitano Carlo Maurizio Ruspoli by Ivan Berryman. (Y)


Born in 1906, Carlo Maurizio Ruspoli di Poggio Suasa is recorded as being probably the oldest Italian fighter pilot to become an ace, serving both in the North Africa campaign and on the Russian front, as depicted here, claiming a Polikarpov I.16. He ended the war with a victory total of 10 confirmed aircraft destroyed and died in 1947.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Limited edition of 30 giclee prints.      
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £50     
WAS : £135     


Quantity:

  Having converted to the Messerschmitt Bf.109G with 150° Gruppo in 1943, Ugo Drago opted to ally himself with the Repubblica Sociale Italiana when the armistice was announced, taking command of 1a Squadriglia which also re-equipped with the Bf.109G.  Drago scored eleven personal victories in the following nine months from June 1944, many of them flying 'Black 7', as depicted here, claiming a P.47 off the coast of Pantelleria. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Tribute to Capitano Ugo Drago by Ivan Berryman. (Y)


Having converted to the Messerschmitt Bf.109G with 150° Gruppo in 1943, Ugo Drago opted to ally himself with the Repubblica Sociale Italiana when the armistice was announced, taking command of 1a Squadriglia which also re-equipped with the Bf.109G. Drago scored eleven personal victories in the following nine months from June 1944, many of them flying 'Black 7', as depicted here, claiming a P.47 off the coast of Pantelleria.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Limited edition of 30 giclee prints.      
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £50     
WAS : £105     


Quantity:

 Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s, of the 281a Suadriglia based in Libya in 1940, begin their journey home after another successful mission against Allied shipping in the Mediterranean.  Nearest aircraft is 281-5, that of Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia. <br><br><i>This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border.  If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light.  Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage. <br><a href=https://www.military-art.com/mall/border-damage.php>Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category</a>.</b><br><br>
Hunters Homeward Bound by Ivan Berryman. (Y)


Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s, of the 281a Suadriglia based in Libya in 1940, begin their journey home after another successful mission against Allied shipping in the Mediterranean. Nearest aircraft is 281-5, that of Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia.

This print has some light handling damage to outer edge of border. If we sold framed prints, we would frame these up and sell them as new, the damage is so light. Instead we have reduced the price online to reflect the minor damage.
Please click here for a list of all our stock in this category.


Limited edition of 30 giclee prints.      
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £60     
WAS : £140     


Quantity:

 In the narrow valley dominated by the 3000 metre high Mt Glarnish the Patrouille Suisse Tigers line up over the runway of the satellite airfield of Mollis as solo Paul Thoma streaks underneath in the dramatic <i>Tunnel</i> manoeuvre. <br><br><b>Ex display prints with slight border and handling damage.</b><br>
The Mollis Tunnel by Robert Tomlin. (Y)


In the narrow valley dominated by the 3000 metre high Mt Glarnish the Patrouille Suisse Tigers line up over the runway of the satellite airfield of Mollis as solo Paul Thoma streaks underneath in the dramatic Tunnel manoeuvre.

Ex display prints with slight border and handling damage.

**Signed limited edition of 1000 prints. (One print reduced to clear)      
Image size 16 inches x 10.5 inches (41cm x 27 cm)     

BETTER THAN HALF PRICE : £45     
WAS : £105     


Quantity:
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138 items on 7 pages

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